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Although many schools offer food education as part of the formal curriculum, it is possible to incorporate food more generally into the wider curriculum, to provide children with the skills, knowledge and ability to enjoy a healthy diet. 

Cooking and growing initiatives can also be implemented outside of the formal curriculum to promote children’s enjoyment and knowledge around food. 

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Our systems map shows that the extent of food which is on the curriculum is influenced by the priorities and skills of teachers, requirements set by the Department for Education and Ofsted and the priorities of the headteachers. It also shows that, if learning about the food is embedded within the wider curriculum, it has a good chance to  influence child food preference and intake and may also benefit other family members if children share their learning and passion for food.

 

See our recommendations and tips below on how your school could make changes to the food curriculum to support a whole school approach to food.

What you can do in your school

The cost and impact of each action was informed by an evidence based approach to estimates and the feedback of school stakeholders 

Cost

Low: our stakeholders estimate this will have low financial cost

Medium: our stakeholders estimate this will incur some financial cost or time commitment

High: our stakeholders estimate this would require some financial investment

Impact

Low: our research tells us this recommendation would achieve the greatest impact if combined with other activities

Medium: our research tells us this recommendation is likely to support achievement of a whole school approach to food

High: our research tells us this recommendation will make a significant contribution to a whole school approach to food.

Useful resources

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